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1875
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1874 1876

Philadelphia Timeline, 1875

1875

  • February 8. Steam tug Hudson, cut through the ice and sunk in the Delaware.
  • March 13. First number of Col. Alexander K. McClure's paper The Times, published.
  • May 9. Fiftieth anniversary of the pastorate of Rev. Dr. John Chambers celebrated at his church, services lasting for one week.
  • July 21. Preliminary surveys for the improvement of the Independence Square begun.
  • July 30. Peoples' passenger Railway (Callowhill) opened for travel.
  • February 9. Fire at Keen & Coates Foundry, 943 North Front Street; loss $46,000.
  • February 15. Fire at 113-115 North Third Street; loss, $50.000.
  • February 27. Fire at Washington Butchers' Sons, meat packing establishment, 146-148 North Front Street; loss, $100,000.
  • June 7. Fire at John Brown & Sons' cotton a woolen mills, Eight and Tasker Streets; loss $43,000.
  • August 15. Fire at Perot's malt house , 310 Vine Street; loss $31.393.
  • August 24. J.B. Johnson, a professional swimmer of England, swam from the Lazaretto to Gloucester, about ten miles, in a contest with Thomas Coyle of Chester, PA., who gave up before he had swam more than half the distance.
  • September 13-22. Cricket tournament at Germantown. The picked twelve of Philadelphia defeated Canada twelve by a score of 231 t0 144. The British officers defeated Canada twelve by 353 to 290. The Philadelphia twelve beat the British officers by eight wickets; score, 282 to 281.
  • September 26. A dummy on the Frankford (Fifth and Sixth Street) railway, smashed by an excursion train from New York at the Harrowgate crossing of the connecting railway; five persons killed, and twenty injured.
  • October 4. Fire at Burgin & Sons' glass factory, Girard Avenue and Palmer Streets; loss, $20,000.
  • October 14. Mattress and furniture factory on Randolph Street above Oxford Street, burned; loss, $20,000.
  • German Hospital formally dedicated.
  • October 31. Fire al Carlton Woolen Mills, Twenty-third and Hamilton Streets; loss, $500,000.
  • November 10. J.F. Betz's malt house, St. John (American) Street below Callowhill, burned; loss, $20,000.
  • November 20. Market Street bridge over the Schuylkill destroyed by fire. Permanent bridge first opened for travel January 1, 1805; rebuilt and widened, 1850-51.
  • November 21. Moody and Sankey, famous religious revivalists, began a series of meetings in the old Pennsylvania freight depot, southwest corner of Thirteenth and
  • Market Streets.
  • November 30. South Street bridge opened to pedestrians.
  • December 2. U.S. Navy Yard at foot of Federal Street sold to Pennsylvania Railroad Company for $1,000,000.
  • December 8. Fire at Wm. B. Thomas' barrel factory, Willow Street above Twelfth; loss, $20,000.
  • December 22. Ridge Avenue Farmer's Market, Ridge Avenue below Girard Avenue, opened for business.
  • The Franklin Institute and Academy of Fine Arts in 1869 memorialized Congress in favor of holding an International Exhibition to commemorate the one hundredth anniversary of the Declaration of Independence. By act of Congress this was authorized March 3, 1871. Congress, on June 1, 1872, incorporated the Centennial Board of Finance with authority to receive subscriptions at ten dollars per share. The State of Pennsylvania gave $1,000,000 to the commission for the purpose of erecting a permanent building, since known as Memorial Hall, and the city of Philadelphia gave $1,500,000 with which were constructed Machinery Hall and Horticultural Hall. On July 4, 1873, the commissioners of Fairmount Park formally transferred to the Centennial Commission and the Centennial Board of Finance, for the use of the exhibition, two hundred and thirty-six acres of ground.
  • There were one hundred and ninety-four building erected. The main building were: Main Exhibition building, 1,876 feet long, 464 feet wide; cost, $1,600,000. Machinery Hall, 1,402 feet long, 360 feet wide; cost, $792,000. Horticultural Hall, 383 feet long, 193 feet wide; cost, $251,937.
  • Memorial Hall, intended to be an art gallery, permanent building, 365 feet long, 210 feet wide, the dome rising 150 feet above ground; cost, $1,500,000.
  • Agricultural Hall, a long nave, crossed by three transepts; nave, 820 feet long, and 100 feet wide; central transept 465 feet long and 100 feet wide; cost, $197,000.
  • The United States government building, built in the shape of a cross. Long nave, 400 feet long, 100 feet wide; cross transepts, 300 feet in depth, 100 feet wide; cost, $162,000.
  • Women's Pavilion formed by two intersecting naves, each 64x192 feet; cost, $40,000.
  • Foreign Government and buildings, etc.
  • The Centennial Exhibition opened on May 10, 1876, and closed on November 10, 1876. The total admissions were 9,910,966 persons. The exhibition was remarkably successful.

< 1874 1876 >

Excerpted from "Happenings in ye Olde Philadelphia 1680-1900" by Rudolph J. Walther, 1925, Walther Printing House, Philadelphia, PA

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