Hope Lodge
Virtual Tour of Hope Lodge
NORTH OR MORRIS PARLOR

ENTRANCE HALL

floor1_hall
The arch visually separates the hall into two spaces — the front being much more guest-oriented, the rear service-oriented. Note that the detailing of the rear half of the screening arch is not as rich as the front.

None of the interior doors open into the hall, thus maintaining the integrity of the space.

Floorboards are laid from front to back, increasing its visual length. Nearly all the woodwork in the hall is original. Some of the woodwork in the entrance hall is grained to imitate mahogany wood. There is a small section of original graining which has been exposed on a panel near the entrance door; this panel also shows later layers of paint. The baseboard and the plinths of the pilasters at the doorways are painted black. The window sashes are ochre.

During the Degn period of residency, all the woodwork in the entrance hall was painted white; the hardware and hinges were painted black. On the lower section of the main stairs the 12 pilasters on the stair walls have been extensively restored, although the replacement parts are relatively accurate. The woodwork in the original finish for the stairs is yellow ochre; the baseboards black; and the chairrail caps and balusters brown. About 1850 the stairs became all white, with a white band approximately 9 inches wide on either side of the steps. This is the paint finish the Degns' reproduced in the 1920's, and it is the current finish on the upper section of the stairs.

It is important to bear in mind that in the 18th century the hall in a house like Hope Lodge was a room and not just an entranceway or a passage. Although rarely used during the winter months, it would have served admirably during even the hottest days of summer for entertaining, for large dinner parties, or for receiving guests.




Virtual Tour of Hope Lodge
NORTH OR MORRIS PARLOR