Hope Lodge
DAIRY CELLAR
ROOT CELLAR

SCULLERY

cellar3
The well is now 3' in diameter and 17' deep. The original well was deeper; the water table has dropped over time. The dumbwaiter was not original to the house, although it evidently was installed sometime in the 18th century. The fireplace in this room is the only one located in the cellars; all of the other rooms would have purposely been kept cold to aid food storage. The stairs leading to the outside from this room are intentionally broad in order to accommodate barrels being brought into the cellars; the doorway provides easy access to the kitchen yard. To the right of the stairs was a well. It would have been quite a convenience to have had water within the house in the days before indoor plumbing was commonplace. In this room the ceiling was plastered on lath attached to the underside of the floor boards of the room above. This plastering served at least two useful functions. Plaster helped to hinder the spread of fire. This function would, of course, have been most important in the room with the fireplace. Plaster also reflected light down onto the work area. The window, thought small, is on the south side of the house to provide as much light as possible. The floor joists, left bare, could be used to hang a variety of utensils as well as foodstuffs. The plastered and whitewashed stone walls provided for ease of cleaning, and helped to reflect light. The scullery was used to care for plates, dishes, and kitchen utensils. The well provided a convenient source of water for washing the dishes. Dishes could have been brought down through the exterior door, washed, and then returned to the kitchen without disturbing the remainder of the household.




DAIRY CELLAR
ROOT CELLAR