Hope Lodge
CELLAR PASSAGE
DAIRY CELLAR

MEAT CELLAR

cellar2
The brick floor is early if not original to the room. The soapstone threshold may be from the original front stairs. The wood threshold may have been used to contain odors. The large beam toward the front of the house is a 1920's reinforcement. The relieving arch is a structural support for the fireplace above it and may originally have been fitted with shelves and perhaps doors. This room, bristling with more than two dozen iron hooks on the ceiling, presumably served originally for hanging cured meats and cheeses. Twenty-four intact meat hooks exist, and there is evidence of at least six others. All hooks are 18th century. The plaster ceiling in this room is an original feature and would have served both to keep the room cooler and to keep any odors from rising to the parlor above. Cattle and pigs were the primary domestic livestock. Their meat salted best, and pork and beef were roasted, boiled and baked. Fowl, such as turkey, chicken, goose and duck were available, as were fish and shellfish. Butchering usually took place in colder weather. Butchering resulted in meats which needed to be preserved, tallow which could be used for candlemaking, and lard which could be used for making soap. Meats were preserved in four ways: pickling, potting, salting, and smoking.




CELLAR PASSAGE
DAIRY CELLAR